Your New Family Member

Cats

Your cat will need to adjust to the new climate where you live. Remember, they are coming from an island where the temperature ranges from 85 to 95 degrees year round. 

 
He/she has also been dewormed. However, it is important for you to bring your new cat to the vet as soon as possible for a thorough examination. Stools should be tested for tape worms and round worms as well as coccidia. Please follow your veterinarian’s recommendations and instructions to keep your cat healthy.

 
There are several types of diseases that can be triggered by the stress of traveling. Stress can cause a decrease in an animal’s immune system thus making it difficult for them to handle common infections or diseases. Animals may not show clinical signs of certain viral infections or tick borne disease until several days or weeks after adoption and may even be triggered with any type of stress.

  • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (also known as feline AIDS): this is a virus that is spread mostly by bite wounds that occur from fighting, most commonly in unneutered male cats. Rarely is it spread from mother to kittens, grooming or via food bowls. Usually cats infected with this virus have a very poor immune system and have a hard time overcoming infections. Vaccination is available, but once cats are vaccinated they will always test positive.
  • Feline Leukemia is commonly seen worldwide in cats. This virus is easily spread via saliva and nasal secretions. It is also possible for kittens to be infected in utero and by nursing from an infected mother.

Clinical signs for both FIV and Feline Leukemia can range from oral infections, GI disease, ocular disease and inability to clear other infections. If you suspect your cat is showing signs of infection it is important to have an examination by a veterinarian so they can appropriately treat your pet.

Dogs

Your new dog will need to adjust to the new climate where you live. Remember, the temperature in Aruba ranges from 85 to 95 degrees year round. He/she may be cold in even 70-degree weather. So when you bring your dog outside, please keep an eye out for signs of him or her being cold – you may need to put a sweater on the dog and be sure to keep it warm in the house while it gets accustomed to its new surroundings. This is of course dependent on the weather at the time of year.

 
Your dog has been dewormed. However, it is important for you to bring your new dog to the vet as soon as possible for a thorough examination, blood tests and stool tests for anemia and intestinal parasites. The dog may have been exposed to ticks (Ehrlichia is very common here) as they are abundant in Aruba. If your dogs is anemic, they may need a prescription for doxycycline. Stools should be tested for tape worms and round worms as well as giardiasis and coccidiosis. These are both parasitic infections that are common among young dogs. Please follow your veterinarian’s recommendations and instructions to keep your dog healthy.

 
There are several types of diseases that can be triggered by the stress of traveling. Stress can cause a decrease in an animal’s immune system thus making it difficult for them to handle common infections or diseases. Animals may not show clinical signs of certain viral infections or tick borne disease until several days or weeks after adoption and may even be triggered by any type of stress.

  • Parvo (mainly seen in puppies) is a viral infection that attacks the lining of the intestines in dogs. The virus causes depletion of cells that are part of the immune system. The virus is very contagious and is spread by the oral fecal route. Clinical signs begin 6-10 days after exposure and include: lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and hemorrhagic diarrhea. These lead to a dehydrated state and if left untreated is fatal. It is important that your puppy or even adult dog get vaccinated for this preventable viral disease. It will take a series of boosters before your dog is considered protected, so be sure to follow up after your pets first vaccination.
  • Ehrlichia is a tick borne disease seen all over the world (and in Aruba). Clinical signs include lethargy, lack of appetite, joint swelling, fever, anemia and nasal discharge. It can take several hours to several days for transmission from the tick to occur and some dogs may be infected for several weeks to years before clinical signs can appear.  Treatment is available and can be successful with early detection. You may ask your vet to conduct a 4DX test on your dog. This is a blood test that allows you to efficiently test for heartworm disease and three types of tick-transmitted pathogens. A yearly test is recommended.

Why Spay & Neuter

Spay And Neuter FAQs

  • There are at least 30,000 - 40,000 stray cats and dogs on the island of Aruba. This is a substantial number considering only 105,000 people live on the island.
  • The single most important thing that we can do to save cats and dogs from all the suffering and death that their overpopulation causes is to spay and neuter them.
  • Sterilized animals live longer, happier lives. 
  • Spaying eliminates the stress and discomfort that females endure during heat periods, eliminates the risk of uterine cancer, and greatly reduces the risk of mammary cancer.
  • Neutering makes males far less likely to roam or fight, prevents testicular cancer, and reduces the risk of prostate cancer. 
  • Altered animals are less likely to contract deadly, contagious diseases, such as feline AIDS and feline leukemia, that are spread through bodily fluids. 
  • Spaying and neutering makes a big difference. Just one unaltered female dog and her offspring can produce 67,000 puppies in only six years. In seven years, one female cat and her offspring can produce an incredible 370,000 kittens.
  • Your spayed female pet won't go into heat. While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat four to five days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they'll yowl and urinate more frequently—sometimes all over the house!
  • Your male dog will be less likely to roam away from home. An intact male will do just about anything to find a mate, including finding creative ways escape from the house. Once he's free to roam, he risks injury in traffic and fights with other male animals.
  • Your neutered male may be better behaved. Unneutered dogs and cats are more likely to mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Your dog might be less likely to mount other dogs, people and inanimate objects after he’s neutered. Some aggression problems may be avoided by early neutering.